Mark Richards (1845 to 1916).

part three (1897 to 1901).

"Captain of the Rovers"

1898. Norton Canes, Staffordshire.
Mark Richards does not appear in the Electoral Rolls for either Norton Canes or Alvecote for this year.  However, he was in Alvecote.

The presumption is that either he did not register for the vote this year because he moved house between these aforementioned locations or maybe he did not qualify because he had not been continuously resident as an occupier in one place for the previous twelve months prior to the 31 July.

1898. Alvecote, parish of Shuttington, Warwickshire.
The entry in the Banns Book of St. Mathew's Parish Church, Shuttington page 75 concerning the Banns of marriage for Cecilia Richards and her husband James Ward has been overwritten in ink.

However it is possible to clearly establish that the original pencilled entry records that both Cecilia Richards and James Ward were resident in the hamlet of Alvecote on the dates of their Banns being read out in the said Church, by the Vicar A.H.Cheshire.  These latter dates being the 15, 22 and 29 May 1898.

The Banns Book referred to can be found in the County Record Office, Warwick under the Ref: D.R.B.57/2.

30 May 1898Cecilia Richards aged 17 years and a spinster married James Ward aged 22 years, a Bachelor and a Miner at the Parish Church, Shuttington in the Tamworth Registration District.  The respective fathers were stated to be Mark Richards and James Ward, both of whom were Miners.  Both bride and groom signed their names and stated that their respective residences at the time of their marriage was Shuttington.

The witnesses were Mark Richards, who made his "mark" and Mary Charlesworth who signed her name.  Subsequently Mary Charlesworth married Cecilia's brother, namely Eli Richards.

These marriage details have been obtained from a copy marriage certificate purchased from and issued by the General Register Office.  However on checking the original entry in the Parish register with the Registration certificate, there is a discrepancy in the date of the marriage by one day, in that the original entry in the Parish register records the marriage as having taken place on the 29 May 1898 as opposed to the 30 May as recorded on the registration document.

There is documentary evidence in the Banns Book of St. Mathew's Parish Church, Shuttington page 76, which states that both Eli Richards and his future wife Mary Charlesworth resided in the hamlet of Alvecote, in the parish of Shuttington.  The Banns were read out by the Vicar A.H.Cheshire on the 10, 17, and 24 July 1898.  This Banns entry was originally written in indelible pencil but has been inked over.  However no alterations have been made to the original entry.

1 August 1898.  Eli Richards, aged 25 years, a bachelor and a miner married Mary Charlesworth, aged 24 years and a spinster at St. Mathew's Parish Church, Shuttington, in the Tamworth Registration District.  The respective fathers were Mark Richards, a miner and George Charlesworth, a servant.  Both bride and groom signed their names and both were stated to be residing at Shuttington at the time of their marriage.  The witnesses were Emanuel North, who was of course Eli's half brother and Eli's married sister Cecilia S. Ward, both of whom signed their names.

It is pertinent to note that this document records Cecilia followed by the letter "S" in her signature.  Most certainly she was registered as Cecilia at birth and there is no subsequent notification on her birth registation certificate to indicate that she had a second christian name.  These marriage details have been obtained from a copy marriage certificate purchased from and issued by the General Register Office.

However on checking the original entry in the Parish register with the Registration certificate, there are two discrepancies which are as follows.  Firstly there is no mention of an "S" as the initial of a second name for Cecilia.

Secondly the original entry in the Parish register records George Charlesworth as a man servant as opposed to a servant, which is stated on the registration certificate.

The Banns Book states that Cecilia Richards, James Ward, Eli Richards and Mary Charlesworth were residing at Alvecote whereas the Registration document states Shuttington.  Most likely this latter document means the parish of Shuttington which is where the hamlet of Alvecote is located.  I believe that it is most likely that both Eli Richards and James Ward worked at Alvecote Colliery.  It is likely that Mark Richards worked there too.

The original St. Mathew's Parish Church register from which these latter two marriage details have been obtained can be found in the County Record Office, Warwick under the Ref: D.R.B.94.

Shuttington is a small hamlet about four miles from Tamworth and our research has revealed that the tiny Parish Church overlooks the valley towards the hamlet of Alvecote, where there are still about 60 houses surviving which were most likely built about 1890.

1898. Tamworth, Staffordshire.
23 October.  At the Tamworth Register Office, George Richards aged 22 years and a bachelor married Sarah Ann Wooley Wynn aged 24 years and a spinster.  The copy marriage certificate reveals that George Richards was a collier residing at Alvecote near Tamworth and his bride was a Factory Hand residing at Lichfield Street, Tamworth.  Their respective fathers were stated to be Mark Richards a collier and Thomas Wynn a Boiler maker.  Both George Richards and Sarah Ann Wooley Wynn signed their names as did the witnesses namely Robert William Birtles and Mary Richards.

We conject that the aforementioned Mary Richards was in fact George's sister in law, the wife of Eli Richards, her maiden name being Charlesworth.

Although George Richards was stated to be residing at Alvecote at the time of his marriage, there is documentary evidence on the Electoral Rolls for the North East Division of Chesterfield that he was occupied a dwelling house and was residing at 7 Whittington Hill, Old Whittington and that his number on the said Rolls was N.73.

The specific entry reveals that George Richards had moved house from Newbridge Street to number 7 Whittington Hill during the year and because the Electoral Rolls must have been compiled sometime towards the end of 1897, we conject that George Richards may have resided in Newbridge Street during 1897.  This would have been the first time that he was eligible to vote since he did not attain the age of twenty one years until the 18 October 1897.

His name does not appear on the Electoral Rolls in the Old Whittington Ward for the previous years.

1899. Alvecote, Warwickshire.
Mark Richards appears on the Electoral Rolls for the Northern or Tamworth Division of Warwickshire.  He is recorded as occupying a dwelling house in the hamlet of Alvecote, Tamworth and qualifies for a vote in Alvecote.  His entry is on page 82 of the said Electoral Rolls.

8 September 1899Mark and Agnes Richards became grandparents yet again when their son Eli and his wife Mary had a baby girl whom they named Annie Agnes Richards.  This baby girl was born at 22 Alvecote in the parish of Shuttington.  The birth was registered on the 10 October 1899 by her mother Mary Richards formerly Charlesworth who stated that she lived at 22 Alvecote, Shuttington and that her husband Eli, the father was a coal miner.

1899. Old Whittington, Derbyshire.
The Electoral Rolls for the Old Whittington Ward reveal that George Richards resided and occupied a dwelling house at 7 Whittington Hill, Old Whittington and that he was number N.68 on the said Rolls.

By trawling the Electoral Rolls year by year from 1898 onwards we have proved conclusively that George Richards was the son of Mark and Agnes Richards.

George Richards and his wife are mentioned the following year (1900) when there is documentary evidence available proving that on the 2 January 1900 they were in Austrey, Warwickshire.

I believe we can safely assume that they were there at the end of 1899 also, even though the Electoral Rolls for the years 1898 to 1903 inclusive prove that George Richards at least was in Old Whittington and most surely his wife would be with him.

1900. Alvecote, Warwickshire.
Mark Richards again appears on the Electoral Rolls for the Northern or Tamworth Division of Warwickshire.  His entry, which is on page 85 of the said Rolls, records that Mark Richards occupied a Dwelling House in the hamlet of Alvecote, Tamworth and again he qualified for a vote in Alvecote.

However he obviously left the hamlet of Alvecote sometime during 1900, because he does not appear on the Electoral Rolls for the following year which were dated 31 December 1900 and before 1 January 1902.  One can presume that the said Rolls were completed at some time prior to the end of December 1900.

1900. Austrey, Warwickshire.
2 January 1900.  There is another grandchild for Mark and Agnes Richards when their son George and his wife Sarah Ann Richards formerly Wynn have a baby boy whom they name Jacob.  This baby Jacob was born at Austrey, which is a small village near the hamlet of Alvecote.

13 February 1900.  The birth of baby Jacob was registered by his mother Sarah Ann Richards in the Tamworth Registration District and the sub-district of the same name.  She stated that her husband George Richards was the father and that he was a coal miner.  Her place of residence was recorded as Austrey, Warwick R.D.

The place of residence is surprising because George Richards is recorded on the 1900 Electoral Rolls for the Old Whittington Ward when he is number N.64 and is recorded as occupyiny a dwelling house at 7 Whittington Hill, Old Whittington.

We conject that George and his wife Sarah Ann Richards went to the village of Austrey in Warwickshire so she could be near to her parents when her baby was born.

Clearly baby Jacob was named after Jacob Richards the brother of George Richards.

1901. Peggs Green, Thringstone, Leicestershire.
6/8 April.  The census records Mark Richards aged 59 years, a coal miner born at New Brinsley, Nottinghamshire and his wife Agnes Richards, aged 58 years, born Lane Head, Staffordshire living at Charvilles Row. (Number 143 on schedule).

Also living with them were their children Jacob Richards aged 20 years, a coal miner, loader below ground, born Radcliffe, Lancashire and another son, not named, but clearly was Mathew Henry ("Harry"), aged 15 years, a horse driver below ground, born Norton Canes.

Their youngest daughter Agnes Richards, aged 11 years, born Stoneyford, Derbyshire, also lived with them.

Their eldest son Eli Richards, his wife Mary and daughter Annie A. Richards, aged 1 year lived nearby, their address stated as "near New Inn".

Their son George Richards, his wife Sarah and son Jacob, aged 1 year, also lived "near New Inn".

1901. Peggs Green, Thringstone, Leicestershire.
19 JuneEli and his wife Mary Richards formerly Charlesworth have a baby son whom they name Eli Richards.  This was another grandchild for Mark and Agnes Richards.

This baby Eli was born at Peggs Green a small hamlet in the Thringstone R.D. and his birth was registered by his mother Mary Richards on the 17 July 1901, who stated that she was the mother and that her place of residence was Peggs Green, Thringstone.

Furthermore, she stated that her husband Eli Richards was the father and that he was a Coal Miner.  This birth registration was in the Ashby de la Zouch Registration District in the sub-district of Whitwick.  My conjecture is that father Eli Richards most probably worked at Whitwick Colliery.

This is an important piece of information because the hamlet of Peggs Green is where Fanny Hardy gave birth to her illegitimate daughter Ruth Hardy.

The 1901 census, reveals that Jacob Richards also resided in Thringstone at this time and perhaps this is the time and place where he met his future wife, Fanny Hardy, who was a servant in a nearby village.

The 1901 census reveals that Fanny Hardy, aged 21 years, a general domestic servant, was living at Snibstone Grange, Snibstone with a James and Elizabeth A. Clarke, an elderly retired couple.

Meanwhile, her parents Tom and Mary Jane Hardy and four of Fanny's brothers were living in a nearby village at Olga Terrace, Coleorton.

Fanny's, illegitimate daughter Ruth Hardy, aged 1 year, born Breedon, Leicestershire was also living with her family at Olga Terrace .

However by Christmas (1901) Jacob Richards and Fanny Hardy were living in Palterton, because that was the time and place of their marriage.

At the time of the funeral of Fanny Richards, a newspaper report of her death stated that she "came to the district" in 1901 and that her birthplace was Coalville.  This latter fact is incorrect, she was born at Woodville Junction.

1901. Palterton, Derbyshire.
25 December 1901Jacob Richards aged 21 years, a bachelor and a miner, the son of Mark and Agnes Richards married Fanny Hardy aged 20 years, a spinster at Scarcliffe Parish Church.  Both were said to be of Palterton which is the next village.

The marriage certificate confirms Mark Richards being his father and also a miner.  The latter made his "mark" when witnessing his sons marriage, so we conclude that he has never been literate. Agnes Richards also witnessed her sons marriage and signed her name in the Parish register on the marriage document.  Tom Hardy, a miner is stated to be the father of the bride Fanny Hardy.   Both Jacob Richards and Fanny Hardy signed their names in the Parish register.  This marriage was after Banns.

Although all the writing on the copy marriage document, dated the 15 September 1915 has been written by the Vicar, I can confirm that Jacob was literate and educated to a reasonable standard.  A subsequent piece of writing on the said marriage document states: "Please Return".  Having seen Jacob Richards write on a previous occasion, I testify that this writing is in his own hand.

Jacob and Fanny Richards remained in Palterton for the remainder of their lives with the exception of the last two years of Fanny's life, when she moved to number 5, Church Street, Bolsover to be nearer to her daughters Annie Saxton and Hilda Cougill.

It is not intended to document their lives in these pages, nor is it intended to refer to their children.  Instead Jacob Richards and his family have been dealt with in separate pages.

Likewise, the remainder of the grandchildren of Mark and Agnes Richards have also not been included herein.

My research to date has revealed that their son Eli Richards and his family moved to Palterton about 1901, as did their other son Mathew Henry ("Harry") with his family.

Their daughter Cecilia does not appear to have moved to Palterton and at present her family life details are sketchy.  The same can be said of Tamar and Emmanuel North, although some details have been discovered concerning their respective families.

Mark Richards (1845 to 1916).

part three (1897 to 1901).

"Captain of the Rovers"


Email: ronstan@richardsbygonetimes.co.uk

Home Page: http://www.richardsbygonetimes.co.uk/

Created 2 December 2001
Last updated: 17 November 2004